How to take geranium cuttings

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How to take geranium cuttings

How to take geranium cuttings

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If you have a successful geranium, chances are you want to replicate that success. Once you have an established plant, you can benefit from the use of cuttings to propagate additional plants especially in comparison to trying to overwinter a geranium plus you get more of these stunning plants for very little cost.

Geraniums, the longer they are kept alive, lose the floriferous quality for which they’re so popular. To that end using cuttings to propagate additional plants circumvents the issue entirely and its also just lots of fun seeing what you have achieved as they grow. Best of all, geraniums cutting can be taken at any time of year as they don’t have a dormancy period and they are very easy to do.

How to take cuttings

Once you have the cutting you want to trim it just below that first joint and strip off most of the leaves. When it comes to geraniums longer is not better. The healthiest part of your geranium is located at the tip so short stumpy cuttings are going to have a higher success rate and once they get rooted properly they will quickly grow.

With geraniums, they have no specific dormancy which means you can take cuttings any time of the year but the successful growing of geraniums from those cuttings is somewhat contingent upon the compost and the light supply and of course keeping them watered.

When you are ready to take your cuttings, take a sharp knife that has been properly sterilised with a mixture of 9 parts bleach to 1 part water, and cut your original geranium directly above a leaf node on your main stem.

Once you have the cutting you want to trim it just below that first joint and strip off most of the leaves. When it comes to geraniums longer is not better. The healthiest part of your geranium is located at the tip so short stumpy cuttings are going to have a higher success rate and once they get rooted properly they will quickly grow.

 

Growing geraniums from cutting

You can always overwinter your geraniums by taking cuttings and its an excellent way to start the year with fresh new plants in spring. Cuttings are a more effective way to keep a plant you already love without the risk of your geranium losing its floriferous qualities. More importantly, these small plants take up less space and they'll provide you with more blooms throughout the subsequent seasons.

Once you have your cutting prepared it’s time to grow them. It is important to use damp, sterilized compost in individual containers or plug trays. There are plenty of containers you can use for this propagation process. If you have specific propagating materials they typically come with a base unit and a clear housing unit that sits on top of the base to create a mini greenhouse. Geranium cutting does much better when grown on heat which means, either placed in a heated propagator or heating cables/mats specially designed to provide heat under plants.

In some situations, you could get by with nothing more than recyclable pot containers from previously purchased nursery plants that have been sterilized and a cup or plastic bag placed over the top.

In any case, you want to fill the pots or trays with compost and insert the cutting directly in the centre, we don’t recommend using hormone rooting power as this can cause them to rot. Place the cutting in a location where they get plenty of light and don’t remain moist. You don’t want them to dry out and these particular plants are prone to rotting if there is high humidity so you don’t need to put the lid on your propagator or put a container or cup over the pot like you would when propagating other plants.

This is very important, don’t cover the cutting as they will rot!

Geranium cutting growing in pots

After about a month your cuttings should take root properly and you should see some new healthy white roots. After you have successfully grown your geraniums from cuttings you can transplant them into large pots and grow them on further.

You can then keep them in your home as house plants or plant them out into the garden once the risk of frost has passed.

 

Image credits – Shutterstock.com

 

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